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North Korea: Witness to Transformation

Berkeley Conference on the Peninsula

by | February 22nd, 2014 | 07:00 am
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For those in the Bay Area, UC Berkeley’s Center for Korean Studies is pulling together a gathering of the tribes in early March. Thomas Gold (Berkeley Sociology) and John DeLury (Yonsei) have played the organizing role.

Prospects for Korean Reunification: Opportunities and Challenges for Neighboring Countries

Speakers:

Charles Armstrong, Columbia University
Thomas Bernstein, Columbia University
Stephen Bosworth, Former Ambassador to South Korea and former U.S. Special Representative for North Korea Policy
Jerome Cohen, New York University
John DeLury, Yonsei University
Martin Dimitrov , Tulane University
Thomas Gold, UC Berkeley
Stephen Haggard, UC San Diego
Jean Lee, Associated Press, North Korea
Sunny Lee, Stanford University
Jonathan Pollack, Brookings Institution
Matthew Reichel, Pyongyang Project
Orville Schell, Asia Society of New York
Gi-wook Shin, Stanford University
Kathleen Stephens, Former Ambassador to South Korea

Panel 1: Opportunities and Challenges of Reunification: Politics after the Purge
Moderator: Thomas Gold, UC Berkeley

What is the direction of North Korea’s domestic politics after the purge, and what are the implications for its relations in Northeast Asia and with the United States? How do we create an accurate model for factional struggles, bureaucratic competition, and other issues under the framework of one‐man rule, and how can looking back at Chinese politics in the Mao era provide insights into the opportunities and challenges of reunification?

Panel 2: Inside Kim Jong Un’s North Korea: Society and Economy
Moderator: Orville Schell, Asia Society of New York

What are the significant recent changes in North Korean society, and what are the implications for opening and reform, stability, and improvement in human rights? What roles might non‐governmental organizations and media play in deepening outsiders’ understanding of the situation inside North Korea?

Panel 3: U.S. and its Allies: Roles for Reunification
Moderator: John DeLury, Yonsei University

How will the U.S. “pivot to Asia” influence relations among America and its allies, and their relations with China, in regards to North Korea, particularly on the nuclear issue? How do the U.S., South Korea, and others maintain policy coordination while at the same time taking proactive steps? What policy lessons can be learned from the experience of U.S.‐China relations and applied to the case of North Korea?

 

 

Comments (3)

It would be more interesting if the symposium was changed from:

Prospects for Korean Reunification: Opportunities and Challenges for Neighboring Countries

To:

Prospects for a North Korean Economic Development: Opportunities and Challenges for Neighboring Countries

Or:

Prospects for a Peace Treaty Ending the Korean War: Opportunities and Challenges for Neighboring Countries

Good topics though. Good luck.

Charles Park February 27, 2014 | 1:02 pm

Reply

Hi, Marcus Noland and Stephan Haggard, I am one of your regular readers and fans.

Greetings to you from Orange County.

I plan to attend your Berkeley Conference panels as an observer, so long as it is open to the public.

Your reference to Kim Jong Un regime to a post-Mao China dilemma caught my attention. It sounds like an apt analogy. How come Kim is yet to visit Xi Jin-ping’s China?

Jiang Sung Taek could have helped Kim’s state visit, before the purge. Is this scenario a negative lesson for Kim?

Was this possibility overlooked by Kim? Or, did NK lose a golden opportunity, from which it now regrets?

With warm regards, Young Whan

Young W. Kihl February 25, 2014 | 7:51 pm

Reply

Hi, Marcus Noland and Stephan Haggard.

Greetings to you from Orange County, LA.

I am one of your regular fans. The purge of Jang Sung Taek, and your analogy of China’s Mao era and its lessons for NK’s Kim Jong Un era in the future sounds like an apt analogy and a realistic scenario. Kim is yet to make a state visit to Xi-Jin Ping’s China. Jang could have helped him but miss a golden

I plan to attend your Berkeley Conference panels as an observe knowing that it is open to the public.

Thanks for your inputs and posting.

Warm regards,

Young Whan

Young Kihl February 25, 2014 | 6:59 pm

Reply

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